Toe Jam

20-something. drifting like tectonic plates. i like bad jokes and cheesy pick-up lines. when i was little i used to believe in faeries. i also have a crush on 80's Mark Hamill.

**18-and-Ups only, please. this blog features some nudity.**
smartereveryday:

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.
As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  
What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.
I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

smartereveryday:

Ever wonder how a Jellyfish “stings”?  Turns out, it’s actually like a Needle.  Check out this awesome graphic that Emily Weddle created from the latest episode of Smarter Every Day.

As you can see in the graphic, a Jellyfish actually stings you with needles.  The process in the photo spans the time of approximately 20 milliseconds. If you watch the video I incorporate timing data so you can perform measurements.  

What’s so cool about this is scientists don’t really understand HOW they nematocyst fire.  They’re pretty confident that they’re triggered by mechancial contact on the outside, of the tentacle… but they’re NOT sure how the stinger “inflates”.  Dr. Seymour thinks it’s too fast to be osmotic.  There’s obviously a channel somehow that opens and creates flow and pressure into the organelle.  I bet it’s some kind of REALLY quick chemical process.

I think we’re going to call graphics like this “Smarter Every Day InfoGifs”.     Emily came up with that name, I can’t take credit for it!  Here’s her webpage.

(via mentalmoth)

thingsondesk:

The Recap Posts Part 2:

The summer is one of the busiest times of year for everyone.  For me it’s because one of my favorite sports is getting into high gear in the Chicago area.

Just a quick thang, blading has not been the most popular of extreme sports since the 90s, and to the mainstream, if you didn’t know anyone that blades, you’d think it was dead.  But it’s not!  at ALL!  It’s not mainstream by any means in the US but it’s definitely not dead.  But the name of the sport has gone from roller blading, aggressive inline skating, to some other one names i didn’t particularly like, and now is referred to as “blading”.  So when you see me refer to the sport as “blading”, it’s because that’s how it is in the community.

The Chicago blade scene is one of the healthiest communities for blading in the US.  And in the summer, one the longest running, biggest street competitions occurs.  The Windy City Riot.  In order to put on the event, a number of fund raiser competitions in the midwest happen every Sat from the beginning of summer until the Riot to produce the prize money for the winners.  It’s a completely community run event.  And this year I was an official photographer for the event and as many fund raiser comps as I could get to.  I took over 8,000 pictures over the course of the day and managed to edit it down to around 80 pics.  Here are my favorite highlights of this years Windy City Riot.